Author Archives: greg poole

Screenprinting with Jane Smith SWLA

Thursday 19th October 2017   10.30 til 4.30 pm
171002-1(001)Jane Smith, author and illustrator of Wild Island, is a print-maker, specialising in screen printing. On this one day course you will learn the basics of screen printing, and finish by making your own three-colour print. All materials will be supplied. Just bring a willingness to experiment, an apron and a packed lunch.
Cost £75 (Friends £65) all materials included; limited to 8 participants.
booking and full details darrenreesart@btinternet.com

Painting in the Park: sketching wildfowl in St James Park with Robert Greenhalf and Peter Partington

Saturday 21st October 2017 11.00 am til 4.00 pm

Clip0002This workshop is all about drawing birds from life, using as models the collection of tame wildfowl in nearby St. James’s Park. We will have the use of the Learning Centre at the Mall Galleries where we will start the day at 11 am with a brief introduction from your tutors Peter Partington and Robert Greenhalf before heading across the road to the park where you will be free to find your own wildfowl subjects to draw. Peter and Robert will be on hand to advise and instruct throughout the day.
There is a convenient cafe where refreshments and shelter in the event of rain can be had.
At 3.30 pm  we will head back to the Mall Galleries Learning Centre for a short debrief before finishing at 4 pm.
There will be ample opportunity to view and gain inspiration from the SWLA Exhibition in the Gallery. The “Out of the Frame” room should be particularly relevant as it is all sketches and paintings made in the field.
Cost £65 (Friends £55)
booking and full details darrenreesart@btinternet.com

Mono and Relief printing workshop with Greg Poole

Sunday 22nd October 2017   10.30 til 4.30 pmshort-eared owl monoprint

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will look at how printmaking can help to simplify and evolve ideas.  The methods we will be using would be easy to set up at home, no press required.
We will explore how to quickly generate bold blocks of tone/texture/ colour. These can then be layered/combined with further blocks, or line The aim to see how many ways we can use to explore the same subject matter.
If you are an experienced printmaker you should come away with some new ideas and if you are a beginner you should leave with a good handle on the basics. No materials or tools required but old clothes/apron or overalls advisable.
It would be helpful if you brought along some recent work to show your approach to drawing and to act as a possible start point for the printmaking.
Cost £75 (Friends £65) all materials included; limited to 8 participants
booking and full details darrenreesart@btinternet.com

Tora Benzeyen – bursary winner 2017

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Tora painting razorbills at St Abbs Head

To be honest, I didn’t know anything about the SWLA and seabird drawing course until last summer & the Turkish Sweetgum Project (2016) . Meeting with the four great artists who are already members of SWLA changed all my perspective on the wildlife art. With advice from them, I searched and worked a lot to apply for the seabird drawing course. It was a great moment when I received the acceptance mail from the SWLA. I was very excited because the dream to see thousands of seabird was gonna be true in a couple of months.

Gannet studies from Bass Rock using wax crayon. It was too hard to work so close to the birds. I tried to focus on the lines in bill and eye.

Gannet studies from Bass Rock using wax crayon. It was too hard to work so close to the birds. I tried to focus on the lines in bill and eye.

The week we spent on amazing Scottish coasts was incredible. Being with dedicated artists and sharing their experiences taaught me a lot in just a couple days. It pulled me up day to day. I always tried to sue different techniques and ways to express my observations. The results can be discussed but it is clear that the week was more effective than all a year that I spent alone. In addition to the artistic side, the birds were unbelievable for me. It was the first time that I saw these species and in those numbers. I can still feel every second of my time I spent with these birds.

Razorbill studies using charcoal. It was very enjoyable experience for me to use charcoal because normally, I hate to use charcoal. But since that drawing, I am using charcoal very oftenly.

Razorbill studies using charcoal. It was very enjoyable experience for me to use charcoal because normally, I hate to use charcoal. But since that drawing, I am using charcoal very oftenly.

Each of the tutors and artists were incredible. I didn’t expect to be in such a welcoming atmosphere. To see their their great interests and hospitality kept me motivated for all week. When I looked back and see the differences between before and after the course, I can say that I feel myself more controlled to understand what I draw and I am not bored anymore when I draw something for hours. Also I am more confident to use my watercolor palette freely and I am not seeing an object to draw when I look a bird. I am looking for its behaviour and try to understand it’s moves.

Razorbill studies using pencil. With suggestion of coursemate Ben Woodhams, I was trying to draw Razorbills just in 5 lines. There are dozens of pages that I tried this way. It was teachful to understand its behaviours and moves.

Razorbill studies using pencil. With suggestion of coursemate Ben Woodhams, I was trying to draw Razorbills just in 5 lines. There are dozens of pages that I tried this way. It was teachful to understand its behaviours and moves.

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Herring gull studies using wax crayon. I tried to use the same 5 lines technique with colours.

Besides all, I feel myself very happy to catch a chance to be with these great people in the great places. Thank you very much all the support you gave me to live this unforgettable experience.

Fulmar studies using pencil. I was trying to understand the bill shape. It took me all day to see real shape.

Fulmar studies using pencil. I was trying to understand the bill shape. It took me all day to see real shape.

 

Wynona Legg – bursary winner 2017

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Receiving the news that I had won a bursary with the SWLA, I was so incredibly over the moon. The news was especially welcome having had to turn down a place on the seabird drawing course the previous year because I could simply not afford to go. Receiving a bursary was fuel to keep me focused and I was so ready to fully embrace it.
I am not new to drawing birds but I am very much someone who has put my artistic career on the backburner to make room for other focuses. My recent years have been spent working within nature conservation in warden roles at some pretty special reserves around the UK. I have been privileged to have had close encounters with many breeding birds and would take the opportunity where I could to make sketches in the field between periods of intense monitoring. But I had gotten rusty and felt that I was not yet where I wanted to be in my artistic career. I wasn’t new to the concept of drawing moving subjects or working in the elements and I was ready to get stuck into a focused week of drawing. I was perhaps more than a little naïve in thinking that it would be easy…

Guillemot studies using chinagraph lead, wax crayon and graphite.

Guillemot studies using chinagraph lead, wax crayon and graphite.

This week has pulled me in every direction a person can be pulled! At times, I felt as brittle as the charcoal I was holding in my hand! To have eyes cast over your progress each day was originally a daunting prospect but it was incredibly motivating to have people notice things in your work that you have missed and will you to try new things to lift your work. There were overwhelming moments amongst all the mini revelations where it felt like I had forgotten how to draw! I think to be fully committed to this week you have to be someone who is okay with baring your soul and I definitely did that! I came here to push myself as an artist and I think in order to fully embrace something as unique as this, there is an element of stripping everything back and forgetting momentarily what you already know.
Similarly, I have become very used to being by myself when I am sketching. Coming into a group of other working artists suddenly felt like a lot of pressure. At first it took all my focus not to compare my work to others’. As the week moved forward, this feeling fell away. Being surrounded by other artists working was exciting. Watching other ways of working taught me so much about myself and the way I work.

Razorbill studies using chinagraph lead. Fellow coursemate Andy lent me some lead of a black chinagraph marker to try. The buttery soft wax left some really interesting marks on the smooth cartridge paper and I ended up filling several pages of my sketchbook that day using that tiny length of lead. Laying it flat and pushing it around the paper I could sculpt out the shapes that the razorbills made as they jostled on their ledges. Pressing harder on the tip of the flat lead left a sharper outline that mimicked the stark contrast of the rock and the razorbills ink black plumage. Switching to use the point of the lead allowed a more delicate line for the bright white chest or the detail on the face. For me this was the perfect example of how the introduction of a new and unfamiliar tool can revive perspective or help to grasp a particular technique.

Razorbill studies using chinagraph lead. Fellow coursemate Andy lent me some lead of a black chinagraph marker to try. The buttery soft wax left some really interesting marks on the smooth cartridge paper and I ended up filling several pages of my sketchbook that day using that tiny length of lead. Laying it flat and pushing it around the paper I could sculpt out the shapes that the razorbills made as they jostled on their ledges. Pressing harder on the tip of the flat lead left a sharper outline that mimicked the stark contrast of the rock and the razorbills ink black plumage. Switching to use the point of the lead allowed a more delicate line for the bright white chest or the detail on the face. For me this was the perfect example of how the introduction of a new and unfamiliar tool can revive perspective or help to grasp a particular technique.

Watching the way others choose their palette, hold their brush or push their pencil around the paper. We were all sitting within the same landscape observing the same subjects but the marks on our pages were often unrecognisably different. It was so refreshing to me.

Kittiwake study using graphite and charcoal over blocks of soft pastel.

Kittiwake study using graphite and charcoal over blocks of soft pastel.

The tutors were incredible all week. The investment they gave to each person in turn was inspiring. To see their happiness as people made realisations and revelations in their work throughout the week was in itself a motivation to keep growing. The guidance given by working artists was so invaluable and isn’t something I have ever been lucky enough to get before now.
Coming away from this week I have learnt to embrace the struggles of drawing in the field. To be able to step back and change something about how you are working is an important thing to remember when things aren’t going right. I have learnt to be unafraid of using different mediums to express texture, energy or light. I have always loved the simplicity of line and can get too focussed on continuity but adding something different or changing the way you use your tools can introduce something unexpected. The thing that gives me the biggest smile is the connections I have made from being around other artists working in the field. It has been heartening to be carried along on tough days by the positive words of others.

More razorbill studies with chinagraph lead to explore shape and movement in flight.

More razorbill studies with chinagraph lead to explore shape and movement in flight.

Learn to draw birds in 30 seconds – The John Busby seabird drawing course 2017

Another great week long drawing course on the Firth of Forth. Our joint exercises getting more and more challenging with guest tutor Kim Atkinson inviting us to use sound drawing (clamour of kittiwake and gargle of guillemots in sound foreground) as a way of explore our toolboxes. What might make an equivalent for each sound we could identify.

Kim Atkinson setting up the sound drawing exercise above the cliffs at St Abbs

Kim Atkinson setting up the sound drawing exercise above the cliffs at St Abbs

Darren Woodhead got us all working with clay on the cliff tops on day 5 to feel out in 3D the forms we’d been exploring in 2. The shared activities right there next to the seabirds, sharing the same drizzle, a potent recipe.
On wednesday, day 4 we had a very brief landing on the Bass, only one hour, but the quantity and quality of work was outstanding. The time pressure seeming to force everyone into bolder, more vigorous drawing.
So gathered back on the cliffs of St Abbs we did timed drawing, a bit like a short pose session at a life drawing class. Crazy that we’d never thought to do it before. Ben Woodhams sheet below seems almost superhuman…he had to find and draw the kittiwakes…first in 2 x 2 minute slots, then 2 x 1 minutes and finally 8 x 30 second drawings.

Timed kittiwake drawings by Ben Woodhams on the 2017 John Busby seabird drawing course

Timed kittiwake drawings by Ben Woodhams on the 2017 John Busby seabird drawing course

 

 

30 second timed guillemot drawings by SWLA bursary winner Wynona Legg

30 second timed guillemot drawings by SWLA bursary winner Wynona Legg

2 & 1 minute timed guillemot drawings by SWLA bursary winner Wynona Legg

2 & 1 minute timed guillemot drawings by SWLA bursary winner Wynona Legg

 

SWLA bursary winner Wynona Legg’s drawings are equally impressive… Fantastic to see her development during the week.

This is only a small part of what the course is about and maybe invidious to pick out individual work but the phenomenon of the discipline of quick timed sketches seemed worth sharing asap.

I think John Busby and David Measures would be very happy looking down on the evolution of the course.